New York Songlines: 7th Avenue

with Varick Street

W 59th | W 58th | W 57th | W 56th | W 55th | W 54th | W 53rd | W 52nd | W 51st | W 50th | W 49th | W 48th | W 47th | W 46th | W 45th | W 44th | W 43rd | W 42nd | W 41st | W 40th | W 39th | W 38th | W 37th | W 36th | W 35th | W 34th | W 33rd | W 32nd | W 31st | W 30th | W 29th | W 28th | W 27th | W 26th | W 25th | W 24th | W 23rd | W 22nd | W 21st | W 20th | W 19th | W 18th | W 17th | W 16th | W 15th | W 14th | W 13th | W 12th | Greenwich Ave | W 11th | Waverly Place | Perry | Charles | W 10th | W 4th | Christopher | Grove | Bleecker St | Barrow | Commerce | Bedford | Morton | Leroy St | Carmine | Downing | W Houston | King | Charlton | Vandam | Spring | Dominick | Broome | Watts | Grand | Canal | Vestry | Laight | Ericsson | N Moore | Franklin

"Seventh Avenue" is used as a synonym for the fashion industry--e.g., when there's a fashion show at Bryant Park, it's called "Seventh on Sixth."

Seventh Avenue has a Seventh Street South because a stretch was added connecting to Varick Street when the subway was built through Greenwich Village.

Varick Street is named for Col. Richard Varick, a Revolutionary War officer who served as Benedict Arnold's aide at West Point. After Arnold defected to the British, General Washington showed his faith in Varick by putting him in charge of the Continental Army's records. Varick subsequently served as city recorder, speaker of the Assembly, attorney general and mayor of New York City from 1789-1801. He codified New York State's laws.


West:

Central Park

An 853-acre expanse of green in the middle of Manhattan, its 25 million annual visitors make it the most visited public park in the world. Responding to calls from civic leaders like William Cullen Bryant, the city acquired the land in 1853 and held a design contest in 1857, choosing the Greensward Plan of Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux (rhymes with "Walks"). After the moving of 3 million tons of earth and the planting of 270,000 trees and shrubs, the park--almost entirely landscaped, despite its naturalistic appearance--opened to visitors in 1859 (though not officially completed until 1873).





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This entrance was dubbed the Artisans' Gate by the Central Park commissioners in 1862, but like most of the other entrances was unmarked until 1999.


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200 Central Park South

Block (200 Central Park S): The curved base of this 35-story modernist residential tower, built 1963, allows more apartments to have park views. Residents have included Raquel Welch and Dino De Laurentiis.




932: A hippodrome on this site was turned into a theater in 1921 by noted theatrical architect Herbert Krapp. It went by several names, including Jolson's 59th Street Theater, the New Century Theater and the Venice Theater. As the Venice, on June 16, 1937, it hosted The Cradle Will Rock, Orson Welles' play that was locked out of its own theater. The audiences walked here with the cast and crew from 39th Street. The theater was demolished in 1962.




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New York Athletic Club

Block (180 Central Park S): A 1929 Renaissance Revival clubhouse designed by York & New York Athletic Club by Jeff Maurone, on Flickr Sawyer for a sports club founded in 1868, whose members have subse- quently won at least 123 Olympic gold medals. The club introduced the sport of fencing, bicycle racing and squash courts to the United States. Heavyweight champ Jack Dempsey was a member, as is George Steinbrenner.

Replaced the Spanish Flats, an innovative, ahead-of-its-time apartment complex built in 1883 by Jose F. de Navarro.

921: Frankt Stella Clothes; same building, different address


W <===     WEST 58TH STREET     ===> E

West:

914 (corner): Building dated 1913. George S. Kaufman lived here from 1921-29, the period when he wrote The Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers for the Marx Brothers. Also actor Michael Moriarty and David Johansen, former New York Doll (aka Buster Poindexter). Renaissance Camera & Electronics is on this side.

912: In the same building are Carnegie Barber and Little Egypt, souvenir stand with the name of a famous stripper

The Osborne

Osborne Apartments by edenpictures, on Flickr

910 (corner): A rambling apartment palace developed by Thomas Osborne, who declared bankruptcy before it opened in 1885-- unsurprisingly, since he paid for the likes of Augustus St. Gaudens, John La Farge and Tiffany to work on it.

Leonard Bernstein had an office here, where Rosalind Russell auditioned for Wonderful Town. Actor Gig Young killed his wife and himself here in 1978. TV movie host Robert Osborne lives here, not entirely coincidentally. Osborne at Street Level by edenpictures, on Flickr

Others who have lived here include Shirley Temple Booth, Ethel Barrymore, Ralph Bellamy, composer Virgil Thomson, director Harold Clurman, actress Lynn Redgrave, writer Fran Lebowitz, critic Jeffrey Lyons, pianist Andre Watts and comedian Imogene Coca.

On the ground floor are La Parisienne, French; P.J. Carney's, Irish pub; and Cafe Europa.

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Alwyn Court

New York City by jeepeenyc, on Flickr

Corner (180 W 58th): Built in 1909 as the ultimate in urban luxury, this 12-story French Renaissance apartment building has a lavishly fanciful facade; what appear to be dragons are actually crowned salamanders, the symbol of Francois I, whose style inspired architects Harde & Short. Charles Steinway, by mulmatsherm, on Flickr president of the piano company, was one of the original tenants. On the ground floor since 1984 is the Petrossian Restaurant, famed for its caviar.








The Briarcliffe

Corner (171 W 57th): A 12-story brownstone apartment building from 1922, designed by Warren & Wetmore, architects of Grand Central. The developer, Charles K. Eagle, shot himself in the penthouse apartment in 1928, a month after selling the building. Anita Loos, author of the satirical novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, died here in 1981 at the age of 93. Loos started out as a screenwriter for D.W. Griffith while still a teenager.


W <===     WEST 57TH STREET     ===> E

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Rodin Studios

NYC: Rodin Studios by wallyg, on Flickr

Corner (200 W 57th): 1917 apartment building designed for artists; the two-story studios have since been split, but their double-sized windows are still visible on the French Gothic facade designed by the Woolworth Tower's Cass Gilbert. As it turned out, not too many artists lived here (or could afford to), but it was home from 1927-31 to author Theodore Dreiser, by then a well-off radical who thought fancy buildings like his own should be collectivized. On the ground floor today are Pick a Bagel and Lilli's, Asian.

Trattoria Dell'Arte

902: Italian, opened in 1989 in the spaces of two former restaurants, The English Pub and The Chinese Pavillion. Noted for its painted collection of Italian noses, including Casanova's, Joe DiMaggio's and Pinocchio's.

890 (corner): Red Eye Grill is named for the flight that connects New York and L.A., its culinary inspirations.

1010 WINS

888 (corner): Studios of the radio station that began as WGBS, named for its original owner, Gimbel's department store. In 1932 it was bought by William Randolph Hearst, who changed its call letters in honor of his International News Service. After a couple of ownership changes, it became one of the first rock and roll radio stations, featuring DJs like Alan Freed and "Fifth Beatle" Murray the K Kaufman. Westinghouse bought the station in 1962, switching to the all-news format in 1965 that it has maintained ever since; it's now part of the CBS media empire.

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Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall by Matchity, on Flickr

881 (block): Legendary concert hall built by steel tycoon Andrew Carnegie in 1891. How do you get here? "Practice!"

Among the greats that have performed or spoken here are Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Antonin Dvorak, Ignace Paderewski, Vladimir Horowitz, Leonard Bernstein, Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Judy Garland, The Beatles, Mark Twain, Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill and Martin Luther King. The film Unfaithfully Yours was shot here. Carnegie Hall by Scurzuzu, on Flickr

In the building are the Carnegie Hall Studios, which has housed such artists as Charles Dana Gibson (of the "Gibson Girl"), John Philip Sousa, Isadora Duncan, Agnes de Mille, Marlon Brando, John Barrymore and Paddy Chayefsky.















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Corner (200 W 56th): Manhattan Club, urban timeshare, is part of the Park Central.

Park Central Hotel

870 (corner): by Susan NYC, on Flickr
Built in 1927 as the Park Central Hotel, it was the Park Sheraton and the Omni Park Central before resuming its original name. Its famous guests have included Eleanor Roosevelt (1949-53, 1958), columnist Walter Winchell, filmmaker D.W. Griffith (1935), boxer Joe Louis, actor Jackie Gleason (who shot some Honeymooners scenes here) and actress Mae West. Two of New York City's most famous mob hits occurred here: Gambler Arnold Rothstein was fatally shot here November 4, 1928, and hitman-turned-capo Albert Anastasia was shot to death in the barber shop here October 25, 1957.

Previously at this location was the Van Corlear apartment house, designed by Henry Hardenbergh for builder Edward Clark and put up in 1878.

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879: Global Gift & Electronics is in the Carnegie Plaza building.

877: Dean Leather

875: Mario Caldi clothing









Hotel Wellington

Sleeping in the city that never sleeps by John Wardell (Netinho), on Flickr

870 (corner): A 27-story hotel built in 1902, named for the Duke of Wellington, vanquisher of Napoleon. Borat stays here in his movie. Includes Molyvos, Greek; Christmas Cottage, decorations; Park Cafe.


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856 (corner): In 1882 builder Edward Clark started The Ontiora, an apartment building designed by Henry Hardenbergh, at this corner, giving the builder/architect team three of the four corners on this intersection. The present six-floor building dates to 1909; on the ground floor is the 55th Street Deli.

Carnegie Deli

Carnegie Deli by IanPhilipMiller, on Flickr

854: Perhaps New York's most famous deli (and therefore the world's). Woody Allen's Broadway Danny Rose was filmed here. On the sixth floor here, former actress Jennifer Stahl ran a marijuana business and recording studio; on May 1, 2001, she and two other people were murdered there during a bungled holdup.

850: China Regency, Chinese; Smiler's Deli

846: Pasta D'oro, Italian

844: Shoes by Aytto

842: Hao Hao Giftshop; Oyster Bar, seafood

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857 (corner): Ben Ash Deli is in The Wyoming, a 13-story French Renaissance-style apartment building completed 1906, designed by Rouse & Sloan. It replaced an earlier Wyoming, built by Edward Clark and designed by Henry Hardenbergh, started in 1880, the same year the same team started work on The Dakota.

855: Fluffy's Cafe & Bakery

849: Carnegie Spirits















843: My Attitude Gift Shop

Corner (161 W 54th): The Congress apartments


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Corner (200 W 54th): Adlon Apartments

840: Big Apple Souvenirs & Gifts

Stage Deli

Christmas in New York 2004 by UB1, on Flickr

834: A New York landmark founded 1937 by Russian immigrant Max Asnas. Mickey Mantle lived upstairs in the early 1950s, rooming with fellow Yankees Hank Bauer and Johnny Hopp.

828: Bagel & Bean

826: Warwick Chemists, drugstore

Corner: Maison, French

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839 (corner): Star Diner; The Irish Pub

833: 7th Ave Deli; Ray's Pizza




825 (corner): Lindy's Window at Night by Kevin H., on Flickr
Tower 53
is a 37- story white- brick apart- ment building from 1968. On the ground floor is Lindy's, the original of which was immortalized in Damon Runyon's stories as "Mindy's"; this latter-day chain-owned incarnation is regarded as charmless and overpriced.


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810 (corner):
New York Convention and Visitors' Bureau; Visitors' Center, 810 Deli. This was the former address of the radio station WOR.




Rosie O'Grady by Thomas Hawk, on Flickr

Corner (201 W 52nd): Rosie O'Grady, Irish saloon. In 1926 this was the speakeasy Playground, which threw a party for Rudolph Valentino in 1926 to celebrate the release of The Son of the Sheik.

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Sheraton New York

Sheraton New York by Solo, with others, on Flickr

801 (block): Built in 1962 as the Loews Americana (Morris Lapidus, architects), it was bought in 1979 by Sheraton (then a subsidiary of ITT) and renamed the Sheraton Centre. It got its current name in 1989. Whatever it's called, it's a "sleek supermotel that offers characterless but efficient quarters for the traveler," according to the AIA Guide. On the ground floor is the Streets Cafe.





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Sheraton Manhattan

Sheraton Manhattan by Modesto, on Flickr

790 (block): This was the Loews City Squire, like its sibling up the street built in 1962, bought by Sheraton in 1979 and given its current name in 1989. On the ground floor are An American Craftsman, Russo's Steak & Pasta.

Equitable Life used to be a major investor in the hotels that adjoin its headquarters.


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Equitable Center

mony-building-rainy.jpg by Ya'akov, on Flickr

787 (block): A 54-story rose granite tower designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes Associates and built 1986. Houses the life-insurance giant AXA, whose U.S. holdings include Equitable Life and Mutual of New York (whose MONY logo inspired the song "Mony Mony"). The building's atrium features a major mural by Roy Lichtenstein; there's also an elephant by Barry Flanagan. The arched window near the top is the Equitable boardroom.


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Corner: Was the Circle Gallery of Animation and Cartoon Art





Winter Garden Theater

Corner (1634 Broadway): hot strike by somethingstartedcr azy, on Flickr
Starting life in 1885 as the American Horse Exchange Building, it was largely rebuilt as the Winter Garden in 1911 and remodeled by Herbert J. Krapp in 1923. Its debut production included the Broadway debut of Al Jolson. Here were the Broadway bows of Wonderful Town, West Side Story, Funny Girl, Mame, Steven Sondheim's Follies and Pacific Overtures, Beatlemania and 42nd Street. Cats set a Broadway record by playing here 7,485 performances between 1982 and 2000. The Twyla Tharp/David Byrne collaboration The Catherine Wheel was performed here in 1981.

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The Michelangelo

Corner (152 W 51st): This Italian-run hotel occupies part of what used to be the Taft Hotel. Opening as The Manger with a religious theme, The Taft was once New York's third-largest hotel; Big Band leader Vincent Lopez used to play the Grill Room here. "Father of Country Music" Jimmie Rodgers died of TB here on May 26, 1933; Philip Loeb, an actor whose career was destroyed by the blacklist, committed suicide here on September 2, 1955. Here now are Limoncello, Italian, and the Comedy Cellar.

Corner: This space, which now has the dubious distinction of being "America's Largest TGI Friday's," was once the entrance to the Roxy Theatre, considered the most majestic cinema ever built. Seating 5,920 when it was built in 1926, it was named for impresario Samuel "Roxy" Rothafel, who had managed a number of other movie palaces before building his own. Gloria Swanson was on hand for both the theater's opening and its demolition in 1960. It inspired namesake cinemas all over the world, not to mention the band Roxy Music. In "You're the Top," Cole Porter declared, "You're the pants on a Roxy usher"; in Guys and Dolls, Nathan Detroit asks, "What's playing at the Roxy?"


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Morgan Stanley Building

750 7th avenue by Drumaboy, on Flickr

750 (block): A stylish building by Kevin Roche John Dinkleloo, completed in 1990. Houses the Majestic Delicatessen, opened in 1972, and Martinique Jewelers, founded 1963.


















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Lehman Brothers

Lehman Brothers building by Vidiot, on Flickr

745 (block): A 2001 office building by Kohn Pedersen Fox, noted for the multi-story video screens that wrap its base; they remind me of the nature show that suicide volunteers get in Soylent Green. Originally built for Times Square Videowall by TGIGreeny, on Flickr Morgan Stanley and sold to Lehman in 2002.

The Lehman Brothers investment bank was founded in Birmingham, Alabama in 1850 by three German immigrant brothers, and moved to New York after the Civil War. It declared bankruptcy during the financial crisis of 2008 and the company's New York headquarters were acquired by the British bank Barclays along with its North American investment banking and trading divisions.


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Playwright Tavern by TGIGreeny, on Flickr

Corner (202 W 49th): The Playwright Tavern pays homage to Irish theater writers.

736: Famous Original Ray's Pizza (the actual original one is on Prince Street and the famous one is on 13th Street); Midtown Souvenirs & Gifts

732: Pearls, Chinese take-out; Teriyaki Boy, Japanese fast food 1600 Broadway by pakec, on Flickr

Corner (1600 Broadway): The site of the Studebaker Building, built in 1902 as an auto showroom. In the 1930s it was Joseph Hilton & Sons suits, in 1939 the Ripley Believe It or Not! Odditorium ("Curioddities From 200 Countries"), in the 1940s-60s Howard Clothes, and more recently Tony Roma's A Place for Ribs. Before the Renaissance Hotel was built, it was one of the most visible spots in Times Square, bringing the rooftop memorable signage from Maxwell House to Sony. Torn down in 2005, it's being replaced by a high-rise apartment building designed by Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Achitecture & Engineering. ("Einhorn" is German for "unicorn.")

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729 (corner): This is the longtime address of United Artists' New York offices. On the ground floor is Nick's Gourmet Deli; upstairs is a Houlihan's. Also Gifts Camera Luggage, a big souvenir store, and Magno Sound & Video.

Tonic

Times Square by mattlehrer, on Flickr

727: A three- level sports bar and rest- aurant; the Met Lounge is the top floor.

Lace

lace.JPG by Johnnie Utah, on Flickr

725: A "gentlemen's club," one of the last few places to see flesh in Times Square. Also at this address is Lindy's, a charmless, overpriced incarnation of the Times Square restaurant made famous by Damon Runyon as "Mindy's." Maxie's Delicatessen in NYC by Pierce Place, on Flickr

723: Maxie's Delicat- essen is under Quad Studios, where Tupac Shakur was shot five times in 1994. (He lived--though he was killed in a drive-by two years later.)


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"When it comes on summer, and the nights get nice and warm, I love to sit on the steps in front of the bank at 48th Street and 7th Avenue, where a guy can keep himself cool."
--Damon Runyon, "Delegates at Large"

West:

Ramada Renaissance

NYC - Times Square by wallyg, on Flickr

Block (1580 Broadway): This wedge-shaped building, put up in 1989, is most famous for its signage--Coca-Cola has had a sign here since 1936 (though it's temporarily absent). The site has a storied history: In the 1920s it was the Palais Royale, then from 1936 to 1940 it was the Cotton Club's post-Harlem home, featuring stars like Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Lena Horne. From 1942 to 1969, it was the Latin Quarter nightclub--run by Lou Walters, Barbara Walters' father.






720: Money Exchange











710: Spirit of Broadway, souvenirs-- not to be confused with Phantom of Broadway

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Corner (174 W 48th): Smiler's Deli & Salad Bar; upstairs is Rod Baltimore's International Woodwind & Brass Music Co.

717: Phantom of Broadway Gifts, souvenir store that has spawned sound-alike competitors

Sage Theater

711: Opened in the 1970s as the Agee 1 & 2, an art cinema, it later showed Spanish-language films as the Cine 1 & 2, then became a porno house. Now seems to specialize in corporate motivational seminars, though it's also a venue for improv comedy and jazz.

709: Giftmania

707: Originally opened in 1910 as the Columbia, a Beaux Arts theater designed by W.H. McElfatrick that served as the flagship of the Columbia Amusement Company's burlesque circuit. In 1930 it was totally rebuilt by Thomas W. Lamb, becoming the Mayfair cinema; Disney's Cinderella premiered here. In the 1960s it became the DeMille; movies like Psycho and Spartacus opened here. It was multiplexed as the Mark 1-2-3, later the Embassy 2-3-4. It's been vacant since 1998.

705: Times Square Gifts & Souvenirs

703: Tad's Steaks, kitschy and cheap Times Square by Edgar Zuniga Jr., on Flickr

701: The Sbarro outlet used to be a Nedick's. Upstairs was Mayfair Sound Studios, where the Velvet Underground's White Light/White Heat was recorded.


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This was the northeast corner of the Eden Farm, which stretched to what is now 44th Street and 10th Avenue. John Jacob Astor bought the land in 1803 for $25,000; his son William Backhouse Astor developed it with brownstones in 1860, leaving this area with better housing stock than the surrounding tenements of Hell's Kitchen.

Duffy Square

NYC: Duffy Square - Father Duffy Statue by wallyg, on Flickr

This triangular traffic island is named in honor of Father Francis P. Duffy, who after serving as chaplain to the "Fighting 69th" Division in World War I helped to clean up Hell's Kitchen. He was also Broadway's spiritual advisor.




TKTS

the new hotness by specialkrb, on Flickr

At the north end of the "square" is the booth that offers half-priced same-day tickets to selected plays--a great bargain and a fun enterprise. I was very skeptical of plans to replace the snazzy canvas-and-wire facility that housed TKTS, which seemed perfectly appropriate for what it was doing, but the new tkts # 008 by workinpana, on Flickr I have to say the red glowing steps atop the new TKTS booth are both attractive and a real contribution to Times Square as a public space. A rare example of New York City destroying something good and replacing it with something better.




Give my regards to Broadway by Jeff Tabaco, on Flickr

South of TKTS is a statue of Father Duffy next to a Celtic cross. Beyond him is George M. Cohan, forever giving his regards to Broadway.



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The Palace

Doubletree Guest Suites Times Square by vipeldo, on Flickr

Corner (1568 Broadway): DoubleTree Guest Suites Times Square Hotel, built in 1991 as the Embassy Suites to a Fox & Fowle design, envelopes the old Palace Theater, built in 1913 by Kirchoff & Rose. In its heyday it was every vaudevillian's dream to "play the Palace"; among Broadway lights by Dom Dada, on Flickr those who made it were W.C. Fields, Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker, Will Rogers, Eddie Cantor, Bob Hope and the Marx Brothers.

Citizen Kane had its world premiere here May 1, 1944, when the Palace was converted to a cinema; after it returned to live theater, Judy Garland had a smash 19-week run here in 1951. Valaida Snow, the "Queen of the Trumpet," died backstage here in 1956 after her last performance; her health had been compromised by the 18 months she spent in a Nazi prison camp. Subsequently it's seen the openings of such plays as Sweet Charity, La Cage aux Folles, The Will Rogers Follies, Beauty and the Beast and Aida. The casting scene in All That Jazz was filmed here.

On the corner, upstairs from a Whelan Drugs, was Parisian Danceland, a dime-a-dance joint featured in the 1955 Stanley Kubrick film Killer's Kiss.

Before the Palace was built, there was a brownstone here where the Barrymore kids--Lionel, Ethel and John--lived in 1889.

1556-1560 Broadway: Times Square Visitor Center was built in 1925 as the Embassy I Theater, a movie house that showed mainly newsreels. NYC - Theatre District: I. Miller Building by wallyg, on Flickr

Corner: The I. Miller Building, finished in 1929, features sculptures of leading ladies by A. Stirling Calder: notably Mary Pickford as Little Lord Fauntleroy and Ethel Barrymore as Ophelia. Bears the motto, "The 7 Avenue by robie06, on Flickr Show Folks Shoe Shop Dedi- cated to Beauty in Foot- wear." Now it's yet another TGI Friday's.


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This is the intersection where Giselle emerges from the manhole in the movie Enchanted.

West:

New York Marriott Marquis

dsc01681 by Adam Comerford, on Flickr

Block (1535 Broadway): When this glitzy mammoth was built in 1981-85--the first major new hotel in Times Square in 75 years--it destroyed five classic theaters: the Astor, Bijou, Gaiety, Morosco and the old Helen Hayes. (It did add one new one--The Marquis.) This wanton destruction led to a wave of landmarking in the Theater District. Up by kirbyfest, on Flickr The design is by John Portman, noted for similar hotels around the country.

The facade of the hotel features a huge electronic sign for Bank of America, and an enormous ad for Kodak.

In the movie True Lies, Arnold Schwarzenegger rides a horse on this building and almost falls off the edge.

Corner (1537 Broadway): The Astor Theater, once on this corner, was in 1948 the site of Babe Ruth's final public appearance, to attend the premiere of The Babe Ruth Story.

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Corner (1550 Broadway): Digital Cameras & Computers

Bertelsmann Building

Bertelsmann Building by insuh, on Flickr

(1540 Broadway): The U.S. headquarters of the German media conglomerate, which owns Random House and RCA records, among much else; better known as the home of the Virgin Megastore, billed as the world's largest record store. The post-modern blue-and-green glass structure, designed by Skidmore Owings & Merrill, was put up between 1989 and 1990. The site used to hold the Loews State Theater Building, built 1920, and memorialized by the Loews State Theatre 4 in the basement.

North of the Megastore, from 2000-2002, was Bar Code, a combination club/video arcade. New York City by maxirafer, on Flickr

At the southwest corner of the Bertelsmann Building is the Times Square branch of Planet Hollywood. Formerly the Official All Star Cafe, a sports-themed restaurant.


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Astor Plaza

mtv by azizk, on Flickr

Block (1515 Broadway): Best known as the location of MTV's studios, this 1969 Kahn & Jacobs building was allowed to grow to 50 floors because it added theatrical space--The Minskoff, named for the skyscraper's developer. (Pippin, Sunset Boulevard and The Scarlet Pimpernel had their debuts here.) On the ground floor are Element clothing, Billabong Surf Shop and the MTV Store. MTV Times Square by wooohooo, on Flickr

The building replaced its namesake, the Astor Hotel, a well-loved Times Square landmark. Built in 1904 by William Waldorf Astor, the hotel housed such celebrity residents as Toscanini, Will Rogers, Jimmy Durante and Carmen Miranda. It was here, according to Cole Porter, that Mimsie Starr got pinched in the Astor Bar.
















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Toys R Us Times Square by aa440, on Flickr

This block has long been famous for its signage-- from 1936 until 1942, Wrigley's had a block-long sign here featuring giant neon fish and the "Wrigley's Spearman." This was replaced, from 1948 to 1954, by the Bond Clothiers sign, a neon spectacular that featured two 7-story nude figures (later clothed in neon after complaints from the Hotel Astor) and an actual waterfall with 50,000 gallons of recirculating water. Pepsi took over the spot, turning the giants into giant bottles, and an illuminated clock into a bottlecap. Today the site features relatively mundane ads for Liz Claiborne and Jockey underwear.

The building below the sign has been known as the Bond Building (after the clothing store) and the Bow-Tie Building (for its peculiar Times Square shape). In the 1980s, there was a large disco called Bond's here.

From 1895 til 1935, this was the site of Oscar Hammerstein's Olympia Theater, the first theater above 42nd Street. The huge complex sat 6,000 people--too big to survive being too early for Times Square's heyday. The rooftop garden, the Jardin de Paris, was the first home of the Ziegfeld Follies. Toys R' Us . Times Square, NYC by Stinkie Pinkie, on Flickr

1520 (corner): This

Corner (1520 Broadway): This Toys "R" Us superstore is noted for its interior ferris wheel and animatronic dinosaur. See images. It replaced the Criterion Theater (at 1514 Broadway), a movie palace that hosted the premieres of blockbusters like The Ten Commandments, Lawrence of Arabia and Patton. Demolished in 2000 to make room for the toy store.


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Paramount Building

NYC - Times Square: Paramount Building by wallyg, on Flickr

1501 (block): Built for the film company in 1927; the step-like setbacks are intended to resemble the mountain on the Paramount logo. Here was the Paramount Theater, which was Frank Sinatra's home base in the early 1940s, and a Beatles venue in 1964; the space was Hard Rock Cafe NYC by L-ines, on Flickr later the WWE New York, a wrestling-themed restaurant. The Hard Rock Cafe is slated to move in; also in the building now is the Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., named for the business in Forrest Gump. (Boy, I hated that movie.)

This was earlier the site of the Putnam Building, which was used as a base by racketeer Kid Dropper. Involved in a gang war with another mob leader, the Kid was shot while being sent out of town with an escort of 80 cops.

The Paramount Building has pre-recorded chimes that play "Give My Regards to Broadway" at 7:45 p.m. every day to remind theatergoers that it's 15 minutes until curtain.







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Times Square Studios

NYC - Times Square: Times Square Plaza at 1500 Broadway by wallyg, on Flickr

Block (1500 Broadway): This holds the set of ABC's Good Morning America, and for Dick Clark's New Year's Eve broadcasts. ABC News runs a zipper here.

Corner: The northwest corner of the block used to be the Hotel Rector, later known as the Claridge. From 1941 to 1966, it displayed the famous Camel sign that blew real smoke rings. The hotel was home and office for a time to mob boss Lucky Luciano; it also housed director D.W. Griffith while his upstate estate was being built. The music-writers group ASCAP was founded here in 1914 with members like John Philip Sousa, Irving Berlin and Victor Herbert. John Voight and Dustin Hoffman stayed there in Midnight Cowboy.

In the middle of the block was Rector's, a Gay '90s "lobster palace" that was a favorite with Diamond Jim Brady--Charles Rector called him his "best 25 customers." New York's first revolving door was installed here in 1899. Torn down in 1899 to make way for the hotel. Branded... by Trapac, on Flickr

Corner: The southeast corner of the block (where the JVC globe is today) was the site of the Barrett House Hotel, where playwright Eugene O'Neill was born on October 16, 1888, while his father was in town playing The Count of Monte Cristo.


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                                        BROADWAY ===> S      

Recruiting in Times Square by inkbase, on Flickr US Army rekrutering på Times Square #1 by Stig Nygaard, on Flickr

The Times Square Armed Forces Recruiting Station is in the middle of the square at this intersection. Opened in 1946, it has signed up more people for the military than any other recruiting booth. It was the target of a smallish bomb on March 6, 2008.

West:

Reuters Building

Times Square by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (3 Times Square): Building housing the British news service, a 2001 design from Fox & Fowle, is noted for its curved video facade; includes the offices of Prudential Financial Services; on the ground floor is Quiksilver Boardriders Club, skatewear. NYC - Reuters Building by wallyg, on Flickr Replaced the 1935 Art Deco Rialto Building (named for an old Times Square nickname, derived from a Venetian bridge).































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Corner: NYPD på Times Square by Stig Nygaard, on Flickr
At the tip of this block is a small NYPD sub-station.




One Times Square

2009.09.15 - Times Square - New York by mark.taber, on Flickr

It was Longacre Square (named for a London plaza) until the New York Times made a surprise move from Newspaper Row downtown to what was then the edge of the city, suddenly made accessible by subway. (It replaced the Pabst Hotel on the site.) Building an Italian Renaissance castle on the spot, the paper got the city to rename first the subway stop and then the square after itself.

The paper celebrated moving in on New Year's Eve, 1904, with a fireworks display--starting the tradition of Times Square as the place to be on December 31. The ball, which used to drop from Trinity Church downtown, has been dropping from here since 1908. The Times moved off the Square in 1913, but the name stuck. NYC - Times Square: Mototron by wallyg, on Flickr

The world's first illuminated news ticker (dubbed the "Motogram") circles the building; it got its start reporting the 1928 election returns. (Hoover won.)

The tower was modernized by new owners Allied Chemical, who moved out in 1975. Since then the building has mostly been a place to put giant signs. The ground floor was a Warner Brothers store for a while, selling Bugs Bunny and friends.


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7th Avenue by ehpien, on Flickr

Corner (5 Times Square): Offices of financial firm Ernst & Young; the sporting goods store Champs is on the ground Ernst & Young - Time Square by technochick, on Flickr floor -- used to be the Disney Store. Giuliani Partners, the former mayor's security consulting firm, is located here-- though considering how unprepared the city was for September 11, it's a wonder anyone pays any attention to anything he has to say on the subject.

The kiosk on the corner is one of the first newsstands to get the New York Times-- sometimes before 4 a.m.














Red Lobster in Times Square by Scurzuzu, on Flickr

Corner: The Red Lobster here has an enormous plastic crustacean outside, but wouldn't you rather eat somewhere that you can't find in your local strip mall?

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Times Square Subway Station

Subway Sign by _MaO_, on Flickr This is the busiest station in the system, handling 11 subway lines and half a million passengers a day. 42nd and Broadway by Nose in a book, on Flickr

It features a large mural by Roy Liechtenstein, among other art. The Cricket in Times Square is set in a newsstand here.

Uptown: Times Square subway by Ddrucki, on Flickr
1/9/A to 59th Street
2/3 to 72nd Street
N/R to 57th Street
C/E to 50th Street Times Square Subway by andy in nyc, on Flickr

Downtown:
1/2/3/9 to 34th Street
N/R to 34th Street
A/C/E to 34th Street

Crosstown:
7 to 5th Avenue
S to Grand Central

Times Square Tower

NYC: Times Square Tower by wallyg, on Flickr

Block (1459 Broadway): This 47-floor office building (2001-03) was supposed to house the headquarters of Arthur Andersen, but the Enron scandal scuttled the deal. Has the fake and confusing address of 7 Times Square.

The Times Square Brewery, a post-Disneyfication microbrewery, used to be on this site. On the west side of the block was XS, a virtual reality arcade.


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570 (corner): The New York Look

566: Midtown Buffet; Expose Shoes

DSC00007.JPG by Kramchang, on Flickr

560 (corner): The cube-shaped building is Parsons School of Design's David M. Schwartz Fashion Education Center. Donna Karan and Tom Ford are alums.

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Along this block is the Fashion Walk of Fame, honoring famous designers.

575: Sunrise Delicatessen










561 (corner): Little gnomes hold up the facade here at the fourth story.


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Midtown Comics - Hero Windows by Graffiti By Numbers, on Flickr

558 (corner): Sahara Grill, Turkish. Upstairs is Midtown Comics, a contender for best comic book store in New York City.

552: Rialto Building, with an old Times Square nickname, houses Nut Castle and New Star Cafe.

550 (corner): Fantastically detailed office building--look at the fourth story. Major fashion designers have offices here, including Oscar de la Renta, Ralph Lauren, Donna Karan and Bill Blass.

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World Apparel Center

Block: With more than a million square feet of space, this block-spanning 1970 building is touted as the premier showroom for the Fashion District.

the giant button and the garment worker by • Eliane •, on Flickr

Corner: A statue on the 7th Avenue plaza depicts a Textile Worker, but more striking is the giant Button and Needle.


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528: This was novelist Carl Van Vechten's address in 1907; though he had a single room here without a kitchen or bath, he entertained regularly, usually serving grapefruit, then considered an exotic fruit.





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525 (corner): Fashion Center Building, a 1924 building by Henry Ives Cobb, houses Nicole Miller, Sean Jean and other clothing industry players.


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Corner: Millennium Towers North, aka the Navarre Building, a 43-story Art Deco building completed in 1930, designed by Sugarman & Berger, architects of the New Yorker Hotel. A 1983 flood here knocked out power to most of the Garment District for four days.

Previously at this corner was the Hotel Navarre, built c. 1900. "Navarre" is the Basque region in Spain.

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515 (corner): Site of Dubrow's, a cafeteria that doubled as a sort of employment agency.










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Garment Center Capitol Buildings

498 (corner): built in 1921 by Russian immigrant Mack Kanner at a cost of $125 million, this project heralded the move of the Garment Center to its present location. Combining showrooms and sweatshops, it was the place of work for 22,000 by 1932.

468 (corner): York Apartments

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Corner: Fashion Tower



485 (corner): Fashion Atrium; constructed as Mills House No. 3, part of a project to provide cheap, healthy housing to bachelors. No. 1 is on Bleecker Street in the heart of Greenwich Village.


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463 (corner): Textile Centre, aka the Arsenal Building. The 1973 TV show Needles & Pins was set at a company called Lorelei Fashions, located at this address.


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462: Hale & Hearty Soups, local mini-chain






Nelson Tower

NYC - Nelson Tower by wallyg, on Flickr

450: At 46 stories, this 1931 art deco building is said to be the tallest in the Garment District (though 1 Penn Plaza has it beat). Conway, clothes bargains, on ground floor.







7th Avenue traffic by kevin813, on Flickr

Corner: Citibank; seal on the building is old enough to say "National City Bank of New York."

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461 (corner): Median Foods. Harvey Keitel encounters a robbery here in Bad Lieutenant.

Macy's

441 (corner): Since 1902, this has been the location of the famous department store founded by Capt. Rowland Hussey Macy, a former whaling captain whose red star New York by Brian Einarsen, on Flickr tattoo is still the store's symbol (and a whale is still used in sale ads). With expansions to take up (almost) the entire block, this still holds the record for the world's largest store. Macy's claims credit for such innovations as standardized sizes (1934), colored bath P6100398 by Short Journeys, on Flickr towels (1932), the tea bag (1912), the baked potato (1926) and the depart- ment store Santa (1870) -- the latter claim to fame cemented by the 1947 classic Miracle on 34th Street, set at the store.


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The boundary of Hell's Kitchen and Chelsea

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SUBWAY NYC - 34th Street - Penn Station subway station by wallyg, on Flickr
1/9 2 3 to 42nd Street
1/9 to 28th Street
2 3 to 14th Street
Day 8 - One Penn Plaza by saebaryo, on Flickr


430: Foot- action USA




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435 (corner): H & M, Swedish budget fashion outlet.

431: A & H Food Plaza; upstairs is Manny's Sports Bar. This address used to be Solowey's, a pioneering non-kosher restaurant offering Jewish cuisine to Jews and gentiles alike.

425: Kansas City Steaks, Spinnelli's Pizzeria; used to be King of Rock 'n' Roll, whatever that was--his crown is still visible on facade.







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Madison Square Garden

Madison Square Garden by Daniel Morris, on Flickr

Eight blocks from Madison Square, where the original version was located, this 20,000-seat arena, the home of the New York Knicks, Rangers and Liberty, is the fourth building and the third location to bear the name. Joe Frazier defeated Mohammed Ali here March 8, 1971; Nadia Comaneci scored a perfect 10 on March 28, 1978.

Jimi Hendrix, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Bruce Springsteen, Madonna and Pope John Paul II KISS 1978 Smokin' in MSG NYC by Whiskeygonebad, on Flickr have all per- formed here; the Grateful Dead played here 52 times, a record broken by Elton John in 2001. John Lennon's last performance was here, as a surprise guest at an Elton John concert, in 1974. The Democratic conventions of 1976, 1980 and 1992 were held here; the Republicans came here in 2004 to capitalize on September 11. 2483 Madison square garden by GothEric, on Flickr

Many people think of Madison Square Garden, however, as one of New York City's greatest architectural crimes-- because it was built by tearing down the old Pennsylvania Station, a glorious 1910 structure modeled on the Roman Baths of Caracalla, considered to be architect Charles McKim's greatest masterpiece. (Ironically, McKim partner Stanford White's greatest work was the second Madison Square Garden, demolished in 1925.) Protests by architects and preservationists did not prevent the station's 1963 destruction--though the loss did help spark landmark laws to protect other treasures. Eagle Statue 002 by ManoharD, on Flickr Statues of eagles from the station can be seen on the east side of the Garden; there used to be 22 of them, all of them by sculptor Adolph A. Weinman, who also carved statues representing Night and Day that accompanied a 7-foot-wide clock at the station's 32nd Street entrance. Penn Station, New York by radiospike photography, on Flickr

In the base- ment of the Garden is the new Penn Station, one of Manhattan's two major rail terminals--along with a 48-lane bowling alley. Architect Louis I. Kahn died of a heart attack at the station in 1974--his unidentified body remaining in the morgue for several days. Madison Square Garden by Matthias Rosenkranz, on Flickr

The Gar- den's office tower is the location of Disney/ABC radio flagship WABC--this is where Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity, among other right-wing broadcasters, have done their shows. WPLJ radio is based here too.

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Hotel Pennsylvania

401 (block): 7th Avenue by kevin813, on Flickr
This 1919 hotel, de- signed by Mc- Kim, Mead & White for the Pennsylvania Railroad, was a favorite for touring musicians of the big band era--in part because it, like the bands, was integrated, something few hotels were in those days--leading to the immortalization of its phone number in the Glenn Miller song "Pennsylvania 6-5000." Miller, along with jazz greats like Duke Ellington, Count Basie Hotel Pennsylvania (W 32nd St at 8th Ave - New York) by scalleja, on Flickr and the Dorsey Brothers, used to play at the Cafe Rouge Ballroom.

Edwin Land demonstrated his Polaroid camera here on February 21, 1947; Frank Olson, a U.S. Army biowarfare expert, jumped to his death from the 10th floor after being unwittingly dosed with LSD as part of the CIA's MKULTRA program. Hotel Pennsylvania, New York by chrisjohnbeckett, on Flickr

The hotel has also oper- ated under the names New York Penta and Statler. It houses the Penn Plaza Pavilion and a Lindy's-- for fans of Damon Runyon and overpriced hamburgers.


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On July 15, 1863, during the Draft Riots, two cannons were fired repeatedly from this intersection into a crowd of some 35,000 lynchers.

fuse by specialkrb, on Flickr

393 (block): This was the Matthew Bender Building, named for the legal publisher, but they moved to Newark. Now it's home of Fuse, which bills itself as an alternative to MTV.































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NYC - 7th Avenue by Keith Marshall, on Flickr

370 (block): This is 7 Penn Plaza, according to what seems like a completely arbitrary numbering system. The Bagel Maven Cafe is in the southeast corner.




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371 (corner): Southgate Tower Suite Hotel, built 1929

369: The Manheimer Building










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358: Furs by PK Mustang Harry's by kendiala, on Flickr

352: Mustang Harry's, owned by the same Irish guy that owns Mustang Sally's down the street. I think this is supposed to be the more upscale one.

350: Seven Bar & Grill, also part of the Mustang family. A less macho decorating scheme.

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357: Pan Zai, flashy clothing (Chinese for "Bonsai")

345: Houses Hochman Furs, Kaufman Furs, Day-Kar Furs. Charleston's Bistro, a deli, on ground floor.

343: DP/Design Partners, art and drafting supplies









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330 (corner): Was Ginger House, Chinese, where Extra! magazine usually had its weekly editorial lunch. Closed 2011. Also Triple Crown, racing-themed pub, and Davide Furs.



324: Mustang Sally's, the older of the two Mustangs, opened in 1993.

322 (corner): Cavallos Pizzeria; The Greek Corner

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339 (corner): Guy & Gallard, local gourmet coffee chain; Village Lighting

337: Steven Corn Furs

333: Offices of New York Press, the alternative alternative weekly. Also here are the studios of WWRL, the oldest black-owned radio station in the country. Formerly this was the home of WEVD, a once-radical talk station whose call letters originally stood for Eugene V. Debs. The Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, founded in 1881, is based here.


<===             WEST 28TH STREET             ===>

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Fashion Institute of Technology

Fashion Institute of Technology by voteprime, on Flickr

A state university founded in 1944 to provide "an MIT for the fashion industries." Since 1949, it's been part of the SUNY system. This building, a limestone slab reminiscent of Stonehenge that's bridged to its counterpart across 27th Street, is called the Fred P. Pomerantz Art and Design Center. Youssef S. Bahri of de Young & Moscowitz is credited as the chief architect of both buildings.

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315 (corner): Kheel Tower, a distinguished 1929 neo-Gothic office building designed by William I. Hohauser -- now condos.






305 7th Avenue by edenpictures, on Flickr

305 (corner): A 20-story office building finished 1921, designed by Schwartz & Gross and B.N. Marcus.


<===             WEST 27TH STREET             ===>

Abraham Franklin, a disabled coachman, was lynched from a lamppost at this intersection during the Draft Riots of 1863 for being African-American.

West:

The sculpture here is the Eye of Fashion.

Museum at FIT

Fashion Institute of Technology III by edenpictures, on Flickr

This half of FIT's east facade is the Shirley Goodman Resource Center, containing a graduate center, library, design laboratory and museum with one of the largest collections of costumes and fabrics in the world. It's named for an influential administrator.

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Corner (108 W. 27th): Manhattan Heroes, notable sandwiches. I got takeout for Noam Chomsky here once.

291: Austin's Cafe, J'Adore II Cafe-- spiffy lunch spots








283 (corner): S&W clothing, closed after 40 years; still has an annex around the corner on 27th. Building has interesting arches.


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Chelsea Centro

Chelsea Centro by edenpictures, on Flickr

270 (block): Apartment building from 2001, designed by Costas Kondylis, has Buy Buy Baby on the ground floor.

274: Defunct address was site of Guffanti's, gaslight-era restaurant.

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Lefcourt Clothing Center

7th Avenue by Jos Contràz, on Flickr

275 (block): This 1929 building, put up by Garment District developer Samuel Lefcourt, originally housed garment shops; now houses the garment workers' union UNITE-HERE. On the ground floor are Organic Market, health food store; City Food Bar; Urban Leather Outlet.


<===             WEST 25TH STREET             ===>

On September 22, 1915, during construction of the IRT subway, 7th Avenue collapsed from here to 23rd Street, killing 25 people.

West:

Chelsea Mercantile

Chelsea Mercantile by edenpictures, on Flickr

252 (block): Notable for its handsome limestone facade. Built in 1906 as a factory making woolen fabric, it became a Veterans Administration facility post-World War II. In 1999, it was converted to luxury condos; Kyle Machlachlan and Bobby Flay have owned units here. Has a Whole Foods on the ground floor.

246: On Mad Men, this is the address of Heller's Luxury Furs, where Don Draper works as a salesman before he goes into the ad business. Here he meets both Roger Sterling and his future wife Betty, who models a mink in an ad Don designs.























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Chelsea Brownstone by edenpictures, on Flickr

261 (corner): Truemart Discount Fabrics, a garment district survivor. May have been one of The Seven Sisters, a row of seven houses at the west end of this block that housed bordellos run by seven supposed sisters. They maintained strict standards for clients; sometimes they were required to wear evening clothes or bring flowers for the employees.

259: Chelsea Gourmet deli--I get a tuna melt here just about every Friday. Father/Daughter Lunch by edenpictures, on Flickr

257: Bella Napoli was Sergio's Italian deli; I recom- mend the baked ziti for a cheap and tasty lunch.

255: Japanese-American United Church

Chelsea Atelier

Chelsea Atelier by edenpictures, on Flickr

245 (corner): When this 1912 building was converted to luxury condos in 1997, it signaled a boom in the Chelsea real estate market. The same company that did the terra cotta here worked on the Flatiron and Woolworth Tower.


<===             WEST 24TH STREET             ===>

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Chelsea Royale by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (200 W 24th): Chelsea Royale, apartment building erected in 2004, nods toward pre-Modern apartment building styles with its masonry base and its arched top row of windows.

234: Bombay Garden, Indian; DVD Chelsea is upstairs.

232: Little Seoul (formerly Togi), Korean/Japanese; Six Harmony Arts Academy is upstairs-- kung fu, aerobics, etc.

230: Chinese Fast Wok, Chinese take-out. I often get the General Tso's chicken here.

226: Explorer's Co.--''the men's store to explore''

224 (corner): 7th Avenue and 23rd Street by edenpictures, on Flickr
Radio Shack is in a tene- ment built c. 1880.

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Marriott Execustay Chelsea by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (160 W 24th): Marriott Execustay at The Chelsea, short-term furnished housing. Dedicated to Marcello Ruffino Roffi (1914-88), whose identity is something of a mystery.



233: Mullen's, friendly pub/restaurant









Chelsea Papaya by Tom Simpson, on Flickr

Corner (171 W 23rd): Chelsea Papaya -- tasty hot dogs and frothy tropical fruit drinks, ala Gray's Papaya


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Chelsea Savoy

Chelsea Savoy by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (204 W 23rd): Afford- able hotel in a new, rather ugly building that looks like it was designed by the Borg. Chiavenna Ristorante is on the ground floor.

216: Porters New York, art deco New American

214: Toasties Delicatessen Chelsea's Choice by edenpictures, on Flickr

210 (corner): Was Chelsea's Choice cafe. An unusual building with two stories of glass atop four stories of brick.

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217: Chelsea Jeans

215: Janovic paints









211: Hana Sushi Restivo by edenpictures, on Flickr









209 (corner): Restivo, Italian


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208 (corner): Regional Thai Taste, since 1990

206: Salsa y Salsa


200: Cafe Fillipe; Champignon Catering; MBS Magazine Store


196: Chelsea Cobbler



190: Eros Cafe is the renovated version of the Wellington Restaurant, an old-school diner.

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207 (corner): Was My Old Lady--vintage clothing?

201: Was The Pyramid, used records

191: Sette restaurant was Baby Doll Sugar Daddy boutique.

Kove Bros. Hardware by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (169 W 21st): Kove Bros Hardware has a mural by the East Village's Chico.


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West:

Health Is Wealth by edenpictures, on Flickr

184 (corner): Health Is Wealth health food

176: Bar Veloce, Chelsea spinoff of the East Village wine bar; was Ciel Rouge, dimly lit bar.

174: Tono Sushi

172: Le Zie Trattoria

170 (corner): Old Chelsea by edenpictures, on Flickr
Chelsea Organic was Terry's Garden deli.

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185 (corner): Merikan Japanese Restaurant 181 Seventh Avenue by edenpictures, on Flickr

181: Atrium at Chelsea, 1987 condo with striking balconies. On the ground floor is Skintology, spa, formerly Candle Schtick.









177: Luigi's Fine Clothing

175: Advisory TV & Radio Labs, repair shop; Lyons Wier Gallery


<===             WEST 20TH STREET             ===>

West:

168 (corner): Merci Market was Absolute Gourmet

162: Rocco's Pizza Joint ('50s decor)

160: Le Singe Vert ("The Green Monkey"); French/Senegalese cafe, complete with live jazz

156: Chelsea Lobster Co. was Elmo, fancified comfort food. Back in the day it was Claire.

154: Chelsea Deli

Peter McManus

pmcmanus by Johnnie Utah, on Flickr

152: The McManus family has owned and run this great Old New York joint since 1936. Edward Norton drinks here in Keeping the Faith.

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Chadwin House Apartments

Chadwin House by edenpictures, on Flickr

140 (block): Low, stripey apartment building from 1962 is kind of ugly, but also kind of compelling. The doorman, when asked, did not know who Chadwin was.

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Con Edison Substation














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West:

130: Was Raymond Dragon, homoerotic sportswear.

128: Shooz! 128 was Chelsea Shoes.

124: Leesam Kitchen & Bath Center






Chelsea Art Deco by edenpictures, on Flickr

120 (corner): Was United Colors of Benetton. In 1900 this was the address of 10-year-old Arthur Massey and Tommie McGrath, "two well-known incorrigibles" who were arrested for posing as orphan twins in order to get handouts.

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Yves

Yves by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (166 W 18th): A luxury condo building completed in 2008 with a striking blue-glass prismatic facade. It replaced a red-brick building that had served variously as a stable and a Presbyterian mission school, and most recently as a fancy Italian restaurant called Le Madri ("The Mothers"); attempts by Community Board 4 to landmark the structure were spurned by the Landmarks Commission.

123A: Sight on 7th, opticians

123: Roger & Dave's, kitschy card shop

119 (corner): Cafeteria, styley faux diner. The Village Voice calls it "basically ground zero for LBGT dining." Meatloaf is $16, is all I'm saying.


<===             WEST 17TH STREET             ===>

West:

Corner: Gourmet Deli

114: Crispy Pizza Cafe

112: Merchants NY, yuppie singles scene

106: Williams-Sonoma--nice building. 200-201 West 16th Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

104 (Corner): Hold Everything container store is in an orange brick building c. 1930, part of developer Henry Mandel's Chelsea Corners project that aimed to create a white-collar neighborhood along 7th Avenue; hampered by the Depression, only four of a planned 17 buildings were completed.

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Corner (150 W 17th): Rubin Museum of Art, opened in 2004, specializes in Himalayan Art.


Loehmann's

Loehmann's by docjohnboy, on Flickr

101 (corner): Bronx- based discounter's Chelsea outlet. Used to be Barney's, legendary clothing store noted for outre window displays. Now on Madison Avenue. The building was part of the Chelsea Corners project.


<===             WEST 16TH STREET             ===>

West:

Chelsea Corners Building II by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (200 W 16th): J's Pizza is in another Chelsea Corners building.

94: Sacco Shoes was A&H, newsstand featuring foreign papers

92: Sleepy's outlet was Basics Furniture

88: Raymond's Cafe

86: Old Chelsea Wine & Liquors

78 (corner): Spot pet supplies; TAH Poozie has some amazing toys.

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Corner: Was Thomasville Home Furnishings


jensen-lewis-10 by dandeluca, on Flickr

79-89: Jensen Lewis, funky furniture store. This was the address of Street & Smith, publishers of Astounding Stories, the classic science fiction pulp edited by John W. Campbell, who discovered such writers as Robert A. Heinlein, Isaac Asimov and A.E. Van Vogt. Astounding-- now known as Analog--also published L. Ron Hubbard's first Dianetics material in 1950.


<===             WEST 15TH STREET             ===>

West:

Chelsea Corners Building I by edenpictures, on Flickr

72: Chelsea Gallery Restaurant (diner) is in c. 1930 building, part of Henry Mandel's Chelsea Corners project.

62: The Pizza Shop, formerly Primetime Pizza, in the 1970s and '80s was The Barbary Coast, which provided "a bit of gay Frisco."

Corner (201 W 14th): Newha Grocery & Flowers

SUBWAY:
1/9 to Christopher Street
2 to Chambers Street

Bernard Goetz got on the express here on December 22, 1984, and before he had gotten to the next stop had shot four teenagers who had asked him for money. One of the teens, Darryl Cabey, was shot again after he fell; "You don't look so bad--here's another," said Goetz, who was convicted merely of gun possession and sentenced to six months in prison. Cabey was paralyzed and brain-damaged for life.

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Vermeer Apartments

77 (block): This 1964 building has a reproduction of Vermeer's The Art of Painting in the lobby. Westside Market on the ground floor.









SUBWAY:
1/9 to 18th Street
2 to 34th Street DSC_0233 by ben salthouse, on Flickr
There is a transfer to the L and the F from this station through a block-long underground passageway I think of as the Hall of Elliptical Chewing Gum.


<===             WEST 14TH STREET             ===>
The boundary between the Village and Chelsea.

West:

NYC - Chelsea - 200 West 14th Street by wallyg, on Flickr

Corner (200 W 14th): Built in 1888 as the Jeanne d'Arc, the earliest surviving example of the "French flat," a kind of middle-class multi-family dwelling. It's an interesting building, with a statue of Jeanne, gargoyles etc. Houses Papaya King; used to have Sucelt Coffee Shop, beloved Latin hole-in-the-wall; and Bagelry, which had the best bagels in NYC (and therefore the world), according to Chowhound. 56 7th Avenue by edenpictures, on Flickr

56: A 21-story apartment building designed by Rosario Candela in 1931.

50: In the same building is Irving Farm, coffeehouse.

Church of the Village

Corner (201 W 13th): Was the Metropolitan Duane Methodist Church; the first support group for parents of gay children was held at this inclusive church in March 1973. The building NYC - West Village - United Methodist Church of the Village by wallyg, on Flickr dates to 1932, when it replaced an 1856 building where U.S. Grant had worshipped that burned down in 1928. The congregation was originally the First Wesleyan Chapel, founded in 1833, later becoming the Central Church and then the Metropolitan Temple. Now, after a merger with two other progressive congregations, it's known as the Church of the Village.

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154-160 West 14th Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (154-160 W 14th): Lavish terra cotta on a 12-story 1912 loft building by Herman Lee Meader, known for his elaborate decoration. This building is seen as a foreshadowing of Art Deco.

51: Village Senior Information Center






























41 (corner): Cambridge Apartments. The artist Stuart Davis used to have a studio on this site.


<===             WEST 13TH STREET             ===>

West:

O'Toole Medical Services Building

36: O'toole Medical Services Building by ehpien, on Flickr Built for the National Maritime Union of America (1964); note portholes. Or are they waves? Now part of St. Vincent's Hospital, which wants to dismantle the building and replace it with a 300-foot lens-shaped hospital building.

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37: The Ink Pad, for all your stamping needs. Formerly Galileo gifts.

37A: Reserva Dominicana Cigars




31: Express Cafe

25: Jessie's Gourmet Deli

21 (corner): Mayfair Chemists


<===             WEST 12TH STREET             ===>

West:

St. Vincent's Material Handling Center

This triangular block was the site of Loew's Sheridan, where writer Ruth McKenney and her sister Eileen would go to from their apartment when they wanted privacy. (It was painted by Edward Hopper, a regular filmgoer here.) Later a garden, the Village Green.
















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St. Vincent's Hospital

Manhattan, New York by flickr4jazz, on Flickr

Poet Edna St. Vincent Millay was given her middle name because her uncle's life was saved here. Poet Kahlil Gibran died here in 1931. And poet Dylan Thomas died here in 1953.

Survivors of the 1912 Titanic disaster were taken here for treatment. This was the main hospital used for treating victims of the September 11 World Trade Center attack in 2001; unfortunately, there were far few survivors needing medical care than they anticipated.

Running a deep deficit, the hospital closed in 2010 and demolition began in 2012.


<===         GREENWICH AVE / W 11TH ST         ===>

Seventh Avenue changes into Seventh Avenue South, marking where the road was forced through Village streets in 1917 at great social and architectural cost.

West:

Two Boots by edenpictures, on Flickr

Point (201 W 11th): Two Boots To Go West; the West Village outpost of the East Village cajun pizza joint. (Italy and Louisiana are the ''boots.'') This was the Hanscom Bakery c. 1940.




East:

70 Greenwich Avenue by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (70 Greenwich Ave):
West Village Florist is on the tip of this block askew to 7th Avenue.


<===         W 11TH ST / GREENWICH AVE         ===>

The extension of the Manhattan street grid through the old, independent Greenwich Village grid is partly why Village geography is so confusing.

West:

192 (corner): Fantasy World, mildly naughty sex shop 227 Waverly Place by edenpictures, on Flickr

184: Yavroom, tiny Turkish jewelry store. The name means something like "pet."

227 Waverly: The back of this six-story tenement was exposed by Seventh Avenue South.

180: Rivoli Pizza

The Village Vanguard

Uri Caine @ Village Vanguard by mava, on Flickr

178: Opened in 1935 by Max Gordon, this is one of the world's most important jazz clubs--a venue for greats like Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk and Charles Mingus. Live albums have been recorded here by John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Dexter Gordon et al.

In its early days, when it was booking non-jazz acts, it helped launch the careers of Harry Belafonte, Leadbelly, Benny Bailey - Village Vanguard by Tom Marcello, on Flickr Eartha Kitt and many others. In 1938, Betty Comden, Adolph Green and Judy Holliday worked here together as The Revuers, with Leonard Bernstein on piano--hence the Vanguard's appearance as the "Village Vortex" in Comden, Green and Bernstein's musical Wonderful Town.

Rivoli Pizza is on the ground floor.

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Mulry Square

21.TilesForAmerica.Village.NYC.08sep07 by ElvertBarnes, on Flickr

Corner: This triangular parking lot is said to have been the site of the wedge-shaped diner that inspired Edward Hopper's painting Nighthawks, though this identification has been challenged: The tiling that can be seen on the far wall of the square seems to be from an old Esso station. The parking lot's fencing supports Tiles for America, a September 11 Tiles for America II by edenpictures, on Flickr memorial consisting of some 6,000 tiles created across the country. There's a proposal to turn Mulry Square into a small park--or possibly an MTA ventilation shaft.















173 (corner): Empire Szechuan, worth a visit for the menus alone. Jeremiah Moss suggests that the building may have been Hopper's Nighthawks diner, greatly remodeled.


<===       WAVERLY PLACE                              

<===             PERRY STREET             ===>

West:

166 7th Avenue South by edenpictures, on Flickr

168 (corner): Pop the Cork Wine Merchants, formerly Castle Wine & Spirits, is in a corner building with a turret that looks like a castle--or a witch's hat.





12a.GreenwichVillage.NYC.25mar06 by ElvertBarnes, on Flickr

156: Pleasure Chest, friendly, elegant sex shop. Where Carrie and co. bought "The Rabbit" on Sex and the City.

152: Oyishi, Japanese, was Obento Delight 150 7th Avenue South by edenpictures, on Flickr

150 (corner): Okuyama, Japanese, is in the basement of this six-story apartment building.

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167 (corner) Six stories built c. 1940. Houses Love Gelato.

Corner (15 Charles): Village Towers, 18-story building that replaced No. 13, a brownstone that novelist Richard Wright bought in 1947 shortly before moving to France.


WAVERLY PL     E ===>

McCarthy Square

McCarthy Square by edenpictures, on Flickr

Honors Private Bernard Joseph McCarthy, who died at Guadalcanal--believed to be the first Villager to die in World War II. The flagpole is from the World's Fair in Queens.







W <===       CHARLES STREET       ===> E

West:

144 (corner): Charles Food

142: Was First and Second Cousin, new and used children's clothes 182.GreenwichVillage.NYC.08sep07 by ElvertBarnes, on Flickr

140: In the early 1970s, this was Danny's, a gay bar where the "Dog Day Afternoon" bank robbery was supposedly plotted. Then it was Page 3, a popular lesbian nightclub that introduced falsetto singer Tiny Tim. Later Woody's, then Nikkta. Now Agave, featuring a large tequila selection.

134: Central Kitchen, American; was Caffe Rafaella, loungey Italian?

130: Veranda, French 181 West 10th Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (181 W 10th): Home to the restaurant Bobo which somehow became a "critic's pick" in New York magazine despite the critic's opinion that "thus far, the food at Bobo has been a disaster." Earlier it was the 181 West jazz bar, and before that the Psychic Cafe.

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143: O Mistress Mine, vintage clothing and collectibles, was here since 1969 but recently moved to the East Village.

137: Tasca, tapas and Spanish wine with a Gaudiesque interior.

133: Galway Hooker, Irish pub. It's a kind of boat, guys! Formerly Chanto sushi, Edelweiss Bar & Night Club aka Chateau, and before that the too-hip Moomba.

(163 W 10th): Tanti Baci is a tucked-away cafe.




167 West 10th Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

131 (corner): Tiny, funky building for the pointy end of this block houses Sel et Gras ("Salt and Fat"). Used to be Pizza Villa.


<===             WEST 10TH STREET             ===>

West:

Riviera Cafe by edenpictures, on Flickr

Block (225 W 4th): Riviera Cafe & Sports Bar used to be a hipster hangout; Lou Reed kicked John Cale out of the Velvet Underground here.


N <===         W 4TH ST

DSC08817.JPG by Kramchang, on Flickr

Block (220 W 4th): This low-rise commercial building, built 1931, is on the site of the Greenwich Village Theatre, built in 1917 by Marguerite Abbott Barker. It was home to the Greenwich Village Follies, a variety revue that featured songs like "I'm the Hostess of a Bum Cabaret!" and "Why Be an Industrial Slave When You Can Be Crazy?" Martha Graham was a dancer and choreographer in the Follies. Tony Sarge, who later made the first giant balloons for the Macy's parade, put on a ballet with puppets. The show was so popular that it moved to Broadway in its first two seasons, and then for its third year started on Broadway, bypassing this theater. Another hit here was Sinclair Lewis' satire Hobohemia.

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117 (corner): Gourmet Garage is part Gourmet Garage by star5112, on Flickr of a mini- chain of upscale gro- ceries. NY Sports Clubs above. Night Gallery Cafe was here.




tomatoes at the gourmet garage by rocketlass, on Flickr












113: Ostia, Spanish tapas; was Stonewall Bistro, a restaurant annex of the historic gay bar.

Duplex by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (61 Christopher):
Was Village Voice offices. Now The Duplex -- long-running cabaret where Barbra Streisand and Woody Allen used to perform.


<===       CHRISTOPHER STREET       ===>

West:

Village Cigars

Village Cigars by Susan NYC, on Flickr

110 (corner): A neighborhood landmark; it's what the main character in Next Stop, Greenwich Village sees when he gets out of the subway for the first time.

James Woods' character has his law office in this building in True Believer. NYC - West Village: Hess Estate plaque by wallyg, on Flickr

There's a plaque on the sidewalk here that says "Property of the Hess Estate Which Has Never Been Dedicated for Public Purpose." According to the website Forgotten NY, it is the last remnant of Christopher Street's Voorhis House, owned by one David Hess, who was able to keep just this tiny corner from being condemned by the city for the construction of 7th Avenue South. Actually, though, the phrasing seems to be a standard disclaimer for reserving the right to remove loiterers and the like; there's a similar plaque at 1st Avenue and 14th Street. 61 Grove Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (61 Grove): A brownstone and red brick building from 1890, designed by Frederick Baylies for Philip Goerlitz. It lost a corner in 1914 when Seventh Avenue South was pushed through, but architects Wortmann & Braun did a great job of making it look like it was planned that way.

In 1947, Anthony Hintz, hiring boss for Pier 51, was shot outside his third floor apartment here. Hintz lived long enough to finger the shooter: John "Cockeye" Dunn, the corrupt union boss who controlled the piers--except Hintz's. Dunn and an accomplice were executed; the case inspired the movie On the Waterfront. On the ground floor now are Treat Petite and Hakata Tonton, a Japanese restaurant that specializes in pigs' feet. Its predecessor, Taka, used to serve grasshoppers. In the 1950s Il Nib--Italian for "The Nest" --was here, noted for its espresso; also Grove Pharmacy.

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Christopher Park

Christopher Park by edenpictures, on Flickr Named for Charles Christopher Amos, a developer who laid out and named several Village streets after himself. (Amos Street became West 10th.)






NYC - West Village: Christopher Park - Philip Henry Sheridan statue by wallyg, on Flickr

The park is often mistaken for Sheridan Square, maybe because it has in it a statue of Philip Henry Sheridan, Union cavalry commander and Indian fighter. Best-known quote: "The only good Indian is a dead Indian" (though he denied saying it).




NYC - West Village: Christopher Park - Gay Liberation by wallyg, on Flickr

Also contains the more benign Gay Liberation statues by George Segal.





W 4TH ST   ===> S

NYC - West Village: Christopher St-Sheridan Sq Subway Station by wallyg, on Flickr

This traffic island features the subway station that provides the title for Next Stop, Greenwich Village.

1/9 to 14th Street
1/9 to Houston Street





<===             GROVE STREET             ===>

West:

52 Grove Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

100 (corner): A three-story Edward Hopperesque triangular structure--presumably built after the construction of 7th Avenue South in 1917. The Actors Playhouse opened in the basement here in 1956; it's seen the world premiers of Lorca’s Blood Wedding (1958) and Steven Sondheim's Marry Me a Little (1981). Mercadito Grove, West Village incarnation of an East Village Mexican, used to be Frascatis Restaurant. Casa Oliveira by edenpictures, on Flickr

98: Casa Oliviera Wines & Liquors, in business since 1935--great signage

92: Panca, Peruvian specializing in cebiche, is a new incarnation of Pardo's. Earlier Cafe Milou was here.

The actual entrance to Actors Playhouse is here--it's all one building.

Corner (301 Bleecker): Zena, Clairvoyant is in an odd-shaped building created by ramming Seventh Avenue through the Village.

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101 (corner): Nuts and Bolts was Duchess, lesbian bar that was closed in 1980 after it refused to serve to liquor inspectors who said, "Come on, girlie, give us a drink."

99: Garage Restaurant, noted for jazz brunches, was Nut Club speakeasy; later Sheridan Square Playhouse and Circle Repertory Theater.


95: Zucca was Pennyfeathers Cafe. Jekyll and Hyde Club by randomduck on Flickr

91: Jekyll and Hyde, audio- animatronic kitsch restaurant. Was The Limelight, upscale coffeehouse described in 1966 as "central casting for the Village."


by iz8p, on Flickr

87: Sushi Samba Seven, trendy raw fish joint; Samantha takes a date here on Sex and the City. Above is the Roof Top Cafe.

On the sidewalk in front of Sushi Samba is a small volcano, long extinct, built over a steam-pipe leak in 1982 (when the restaurant was Buffalo Roadhouse).


<===       BLEECKER STREET / BARROW STREET             ===>

West:

Bleecker & 7th Avenue South by edenpictures on Flickr

Point (296 Bleecker): Was Mitali West, Bengali restaurant that explained the name of Mitali East on East 6th Street. Now a burger franchise.


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73 (corner): Parsley Sage bookstore is in a two-story building designed by Samuel H. Brooks in 1927.

69 (corner): Bleecker Street Pizza by groovehouse, on Flickr
Bleecker Street Pizza, Tuscan thin-crust. Was a Japanese restaurant.


<===       BARROW STREET / BLEECKER STREET             ===>

West:

Centro Vinoteca by npatterson, on Flickr

74 (corner): Centro Vinoteca, run by Anne Burrell, Mario Batali's sidekick on Iron Chef.

Corner (9 Commerce): The corner of this building was knocked off by the Seventh Avenue extension (1911-1917).


W <===   COMMERCE ST



27 1/2 Morton Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (27 1/2 Morton): An odd-shaped six-story building from the 1910s. On the ground floor is Doma na Rohu ("Home on the Corner"), a Czech restaurant with Old World charm. From 1997 to 2011, this was Hercules Fancy Grocery, which stocked 400 kinds of beer.

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caliente by Paulo C, on Flickr

Corner (284 Bleecker): Caliente Cab Co., long-standing kitschy Mexican

51: Gifted, gift store






















Corner (13 Morton): Five-story apartment building, built c. 1920.


<===             MORTON STREET             ===>

West:

A Greenstreets-landscaped traffic island.
















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41 (corner): A new condo known as The Luminary.

29: This long, six-story building that went up in 1998 houses several restaurants, including Hurapan Kitchen, pan-Asian; Mirchi, Indian; and Yoko, Japanese. Village Tavern by edenpictures, on Flickr








Corner (48 Bedford): Five stories built c. 1900


<===       BEDFORD STREET       ===>

West:

Corner (59 Bedford): An eight-story co-op from 1920.

28: Mas las Grillade was Movida, before that Club Neva. 26 7th Avenue South by edenpictures, on Flickr

26 (corner): This five-story building was built in 1905, though its odd-shaped eastern end was built later, after part of the building was lopped off for the extension of Seventh Avenue South, which went through in 1911-17.

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A Greenstreets-landscaped traffic island.
















<===             LEROY STREET             ===>

West:

22: Nowbar was Milk Bar NYPL: Hudson Park Branch by utopianbranchlibrary, on Flickr

66 Leroy: Hudson Park Branch (NYPL) first opened in 1906; poet Marianne Moore worked here from 1921-25.





Dapolito Recreation Center

Dapolito Recreation Center by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner: Opened in 1908 as the Carmine Recreation Center, one of 12 public bathhouses commissioned by Mayor William Strong. Designed by Renwick, Aspinwall and Tucker, it features an indoor pool (with a Keith Haring mural), basketball and tennis courts, and a computer center. It was renamed after the 2003 death of Anthony Dapolito, the longtime owner of Vesuvio Bakery who served for many years as chair of Community Board 2, where he protected and improved Greenwich Village's parks.

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21: Luke + Leroy was Crazy Nanny's, storied lesbian bar


15: Grand Sichuan, Chinese









7: Hadom, Israeli vegetarian




67 Carmine Street by edenpictures, on Flickr







Corner (67 Carmine): Jaunty modernist building houses Ayza, wine and chocolate bar.


<===             CLARKSON ST / CARMINE ST             ===>

South of Carmine 7th Avenue South becomes Varick, a street that existed before 7th Avenue was forced south through the Village.

West:

207 Varick Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

225 : Lucy Browne's (formerly Steak Frites, before that Brothers BBQ), Getting Hungry deli are on the ground floor of Metropolitan Center, home to SUNY's Empire State College. (Not to be confused with Empire State University, Peter Parker's alma mater.) The deli features a four-ton lion hand-carved from teak in Brazil.














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226 (corner): Phil's Pizza

Corner (63 Downing): Downing Court, 10-story apartment building from 1986

Red Corner I by edenpictures, on Flickr




220 (corner): Tiny triangular building houses the Red Corner Cafe.


DOWNING ST       ===>







<===             WEST HOUSTON STREET             ===>

West:

Appraisers Stores Building

Appraisers Stores Building III by edenpictures, on Flickr

201 (block): Designed by Albert Buchman and Eli Jacques Kahn, this was built in 1929 as the United States Appraisers' Stores Building, a federal building that warehoused goods seized by the Customs Bureau. During World War II, the building was reportedly used for secret atomic experiments. The Atomic Energy Commission moved offices to the building in 1959.

The building houses an INS detention center, used to hold what would be called "political prisoners" if they were in another country. After September 11, it is believed to have held numerous "special guests"--though the point of a secret jail like this one is that one doesn't know who or how many. Appraisers Stores Building I by edenpictures, on Flickr As commentator John Bloom wrote, "I've seen buildings like this in other countries--in Moscow, in Istanbul, in Mexico City--but I had never before seen an unmarked urban detention center in the U.S."

Also in the building is the Environmental Measurements Laboratory, which is the government's main radiation-testing lab. It helped monitor the environmental consequences of September 11. It's now part of the Department of Homeland Security.

Other offices in the building include Manhattan's main passport office, a branch of the National Archives and the local office of Rep. Jerry Nadler.

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S.O.B.s

MYSELF at S.O.B.S 2 by Alexandra (Sasha) Lerman, on Flickr

204 (corner): The name means "Sounds of Brazil," but all manner of world music can be heard here as well. Opened 1982. Wale & UCB by tinatinatina, on Flickr




Toli Nameless at S.O.B.S by Alexandra (Sasha) Lerman, on Flickr

































200: Deb's Catering


W <===     KING STREET     ===> E

West:

185 (corner): Dizzy Izzy's New York Bagels


Corner (171 Varick): Built in 1926 as a garage; now a self-storage facility. Among the buildings torn down to make room for it were 69-71 Charlton, described in 1915 by American Architect as being among "the best masterpieces of our old city homes."

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180 (block): The Roanwell Building, a 17-story commercial building from 1929 that houses General Art, an art-world framing service since 1971. On the 9th floor here is Dover Bookstore, an outlet for Dover Press. Verso Books used to be here as well. The building is also home to a number of architectural and design firms, including 2x4, MASS.com, Michael Sorkin Studio/Terreform, Hargreaves Associates, MESH Architectures and Thomas Phifer & Partners.


W <===     CHARLTON STREET     ===> E

West:

Jazzy's by edenpictures, on Flickr

163 (corner): Jazzy's restaurant is a "unique concept in dining" and "cuisine at it finest." The unique concept seems to be that they have a lot of things to choose from.


























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WNYC

WNYC Performance Studio by toddmundt, on Flickr

160 (corner): This a 12-story commercial building from 1927 is home to New York City's public radio station, which produces national programming like On the Media, Studio 360 and Radiolab, as well as local prgorams like The Brian Lehrer Show and The Leonard Lopate Show. On the ground floor is The Greene Space, the station's performance studio. Also here is the Varick Street Incubator, an attempt by NYU to foster start-up businesses.

This was the final site of Richmond Hill, the colonial mansion that served as a military headquarters for General George Washington. During Washington's first presidency, it was the official residence for Vice President John Adams; his wife Abigail wrote that "in natural beauty it might vie with the most delicious spot I ever saw." Aaron Burr purchased it as a country house in 1794; on July 11, 1804, after he had become vice president, Burr left from here for his infamous duel with Alexander Hamilton in New Jersey.

It was moved to this spot from a location somewhat to the southeast when John Jacob Astor bought the estate, leveled the hill and subdivided the property. The mansion became a theater in 1831, which featured the wild animal acts of Isaac Van Amburgh, reputedly the first person to put his head in a lion's mouth. The building was demolished in 1849.


W <===     VANDAM STREET     ===> E

West:

City Winery by lulun & kame, on Flickr

Corner (155 Varick): City Winery, restaurant/ music venue where you can make your own wine 137 Varick Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

137 (corner): Scott Jordan Furniture, hand-crafted at the former Brooklyn Navy Yard. In an eight-story building, c. 1900.

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IMG_2277 by drierp, on Flickr

150 (block): This 10-story building that went up in 1926 is home to Green- house, an eco-friendly nightclub made from recycled materials, with organic vodka and LED lighting. It's in some sense a reinvention of Club Shelter, a long-running House party that moved here from 39th Street into what was Club Standard, and before that Flow, pricey nightclub.








W <===     SPRING STREET     ===> E

West:

131 (block): The New York Times says this "might be New York’s most college-dorm-like office building."




















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Trump Soho

Trump SOHO by Alex (Darth Vader), on Flickr

Block (246 Spring): A 46-story sky-reflecting glass high-rise completed in 2010--a project of dubious legality that even its owners admit has a lot wrong with it. Some buyers were offered partial refunds if they agreed not to sue.

Human bones were uncovered on the site during construction, which turned out to be 19th Century remains from the burial crypts of the Spring Street Presbyterian Church, a brick building completed in 1836 that burned down in 1963. An earlier church for the fiercely abolitionist congregation was built here in 1811, and destroyed by a racist mob in 1834.


W <===     DOMINICK STREET     ===> E

West:

119 Varick Street by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (121 Varick): A 12-story building from 1929, designed by Victor Mayper.










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114 (corner): Icon Varick Street Parking

Amelia's by edenpictures, on Flickr







110 (corner): Amelia's, classic diner opened 1965.


W <===     BROOME STREET     ===> E

West:

Holland Tunnel Entrance

NYC: Holland Tunnel by wallyg, on Flickr

The Holland Tunnel, connecting Manhattan to Jersey City, was started in 1922 and completed in 1927, allowing cars to drive into New York City from New Jersey for the first time. Though the name evokes New York City's Dutch heritage, it actually honors Clifford Milburn Holland, chief engineer of the project, who died on October Holland Tunnel by 24gotham, on Flickr 7, 1924, the day before the tunnels dug from New York and New Jersey were con- nected. The project was completed by famed tunnel designer Ole Singstad, whose pioneering ventilation system allowed the Holland Tunnel to be the first vehicular tunnel of substantial length.

On I Love Lucy, Lucy is said to have made U-turn in the Holland Tunnel, tying up traffic all the way to East Orange. The mutant insect in The Deadly Mantis is killed here with nerve gas.

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Varick Street and I drove south
With my hands on the wheel and your taste in my mouth
Janine
Jesus to my left, the Holland Tunnel on my right
Angels shine down from the traffic light.
--"Janine," Soul Coughing


























W <===     WATTS STREET     ===> E

West:

Holland Plaza Building

One Hudson Square by edenpictures, on Flickr

Block (75 Varick): A 1930 Art Deco structure designed by Ely Jacques Kahn for the printing industry, now houses the Manhattan Center of Adelphi University, founded in 1896 as New York's first co-ed college, as well as the Metropolitan College of New York, founded in 1964 by Audrey Cohen.





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80: This was the shop of Charles H. Fletcher, promoter of Fletcher's Castoria, a root beer-flavored children's laxative.


GRAND ST         E ===>

uai6 by YellowArrow, on Flickr

Corner (423 Canal): A three- story bank building from 1922 -- demolished in 2007.


W <===     CANAL STREET     ===> E
The northern boundary of Tribeca

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W <===         VESTRY ST






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W <===     LAIGHT STREET     ===> E

West:

Hudson Square

Once known as St. John's Park, this place was described by the New York Evening Post in 1847 as a ''spot of eden loveliness...retiring from the din and tumult of the noisy town to enjoy its own secret solitude.'' Then, in 1869, it was sold by Trinity Church to Commodore Vanderbilt for a railroad terminal, and in 1927 it became the rotary that the Holland Tunnel emerges into.

From 1807 until 1918 there was a church, St. John's Chapel, on the Varick Street side.




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Tribeca Cinemas

NYC - TriBeCa: TriBeCa Cinemas by wallyg, on Flickr

A restaurant and a art-house miniplex that opened in 1996 as The Screening Room, it was at the time Manhattan's only cinema below Canal Street. It closed in 2003, a victim of Downtown's post-September 11 depression. Now known as the Tribeca Film Center, it's used for special events like the Tribeca Film Festival.


W <===     ERICSSON PL/BEACH ST     ===> E

West:

NYC - TriBeCa: NYPD 1st Precinct by wallyg, on Flickr

Corner (16 Ericsson Place): NYPD's 1st Precinct covers all of Manhattan south of the Brooklyn Bridge, plus everything south of Houston and west of Broadway. There was one murder in this area in 2004. The building dates to 1912 (when this was the 4th Precinct), a Renaissance Revival landmark by Hoppin & Koen.

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W <===     NORTH MOORE STREET     ===> E

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5: The first black newspaper in the country, Freedom's Journal, began publishing at this address on March 16, 1827. It was only here for about three weeks before moving, just as briefly, to No. 6 across the street, and then finding longer term digs on Church Street.

Corner (140 Franklin): These condos date to 1887, originally built for the Walton paper company. Architect Albert Wagner also did the Puck Building.

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"Ghostbusters" Firehouse

Ghostbuster Firehouse by Craft*ology, on Flickr

Corner (14 N Moore): Hook & Ladder No. 8 was used for exterior shots of the Ghostbusters' HQ in both the original movie and the sequel. The building dates back to 1912. Vincent Halloran, a lieutenant here, was killed in the September 11 attacks. 218-224 West Broadway by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (218-224 W Broadway): A grand 1881 red brick building by George W. Da Cunha, architect of the Gramercy Hotel.


W <===     FRANKLIN STREET     ===> E

West:


























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Finn Square

A triangle (like most Manhattan ''squares'') created in 1919 and named for Philip Schuyler Finn, a World War I soldier who fought and died in 1918 with the 69th Regiment, the "Fighting Irish." He was the son of Tammany Hall leader "Battery" Dan Finn (1845-1910), who got his nickname preserving Battery Park from encroachment by commercial piers. As a police magistrate, Finn was known for dispensing picturesque advice rather than harsh sentences. He was remembered as an advocate for the weak and oppressed.

Finn's square was just a weed-filled traffic island until 1998, when it got an attractive makeover via the Greenstreets program.












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